Voting for Change: The Power of Hope

As the gears of democracy turn and the election fever grips our nation, a palpable sense of expectation fills the air. The ballot box, it seems, holds more than just votes. It holds hope. This week, let’s untangle this thread of hope guided by Charles R. Snyder, a psychologist, and Ernst Bloch, a philosopher. With […]

Voting for Change: The Power of Hope
Voting for Change: The Power of Hope
  • Yayınlanma14 May 2023 10:11
  • Güncelleme14 May 2023 10:12

As the gears of democracy turn and the election fever grips our nation, a palpable sense of expectation fills the air. The ballot box, it seems, holds more than just votes. It holds hope. This week, let’s untangle this thread of hope guided by Charles R. Snyder, a psychologist, and Ernst Bloch, a philosopher. With their insights, we’ll see how hope, like a compass, could guide us through the democratic process.

Part 1: Snyder’s Ballot of Hope

Charles R. Snyder painted hope as a triptych of goal-setting, agency, and pathways. As we stand at the threshold of change, his theory finds a fresh resonance.

  1. 1 – Goal-setting: The ballot, in essence, is our collective goal-setting process. It’s an avenue for us, the voters, to express our aspirations for the nation, much like Frodo’s journey to destroy the One Ring in “The Lord of the Rings.”
  2. 2 – Agency: Casting a vote is an exercise of agency, a belief in our ability to effect change, much like Chris Gardner’s unwavering spirit in “The Pursuit of Happyness.” Even when the road seems steep, our faith in our ability to climb keeps us going.
  3. 3 – Pathways: Each vote is a step on the pathway towards our collective goals. It’s a reminder of Andy Dufresne’s determination in “The Shawshank Redemption,” who found his path to freedom, one painstaking inch at a time.

Snyder’s theory (2002) suggests that high hope levels can elevate resilience, problem-solving skills, and overall well-being. In the context of elections, our collective hope could be the driving force for positive change.

Part 2: Bloch’s Hope: The Revolutionary Ballot

Ernst Bloch saw hope as a revolutionary spark, capable of driving societal transformation. In this election season, his philosophy becomes even more poignant.

In dystopian narratives like “1984” and “The Handmaid’s Tale,” the protagonists Winston Smith and Offred are symbols of hope in oppressive regimes. Their stories remind us of our potential to be harbingers of change, even in challenging circumstances.

The film “V for Vendetta” crystallizes Bloch’s concept of hope. V, the enigmatic revolutionary, sees hope as more than just wishful thinking. He sees it as a catalyst for transformation.

As per Bloch (1986), our hope, much like our votes, isn’t passive. It’s an active effort to build a better future. It’s the belief that our voice, our vote, can catalyze change.

Snyder and Bloch’s insights into hope find a new relevance at the time of election. Their theories remind us that our votes are more than just a democratic duty. They’re our beacon of hope, our faith in a brighter future. As we approach the ballot box, let’s remember, we’re not just voting for a candidate. We’re voting for hope, for change, and for the future we aspire to see.

References:

  1. 1 – Bloch, E. (1986). The Principle of Hope. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
  2. 2 – Snyder, C. R. (2002). Hope Theory: Rainbows in the Mind. Psychological Inquiry, 13(4), 249-275.

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